stargazer
Favorite room
stargazer
+
pradafied:

Audacieuse, Anna Ewers, in Valentino, photographed by Mert & Marcus for Vogue Paris August 2014
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she-loves-fashion:

Julia Jamin by Baard Lunde for L’Officiel Paris August 2014 
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she-loves-fashion:

Sasha Luss - Dior’s Red Hot Fall 2014 
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fohk:

“That woman deserves her revenge and we deserve to die”
Kill Bill: Vol. 1Quentin Tarantino
+
bokunosonzai:

Inside the Explosion
Fireworks viewed through the use of a drone.
bokunosonzai:

Inside the Explosion
Fireworks viewed through the use of a drone.
bokunosonzai:

Inside the Explosion
Fireworks viewed through the use of a drone.
bokunosonzai:

Inside the Explosion
Fireworks viewed through the use of a drone.
bokunosonzai:

Inside the Explosion
Fireworks viewed through the use of a drone.
bokunosonzai:

Inside the Explosion
Fireworks viewed through the use of a drone.
bokunosonzai:

Inside the Explosion
Fireworks viewed through the use of a drone.
+
instagram:

The Sneaker Creatures of @hazzyboom

To see more of Hazzy Lin’s sneaker art creations, follow @hazzyboom on Instagram 

Graphic designer Hazzy Lin (@hazzyboom) is a self-described “sneaker head.”  Living in Taipei, Hazzy combines his love for street wear with his talent for illustration to create some of the most imaginative collections of sneaker art on Instagram.

His first sketch of a mutant shoe-creature was a monster inspired by a pair of Nike Air SB Jordans. The response from his followers encouraged him to continue experimenting, leading to more elaborate designs like his Reebok Pump with the face of an attacking dog, the fins of a shark and the body of a high-top.

Hazzy’s success for creating fantastical sneaker transformations has led him to start his own graphic design operation. When he needs a bit of inspiration, Hazzy scrolls through all his favorite Instagram sneaker accounts and keeps an eye on the #sneakerart hashtag.
instagram:

The Sneaker Creatures of @hazzyboom

To see more of Hazzy Lin’s sneaker art creations, follow @hazzyboom on Instagram 

Graphic designer Hazzy Lin (@hazzyboom) is a self-described “sneaker head.”  Living in Taipei, Hazzy combines his love for street wear with his talent for illustration to create some of the most imaginative collections of sneaker art on Instagram.

His first sketch of a mutant shoe-creature was a monster inspired by a pair of Nike Air SB Jordans. The response from his followers encouraged him to continue experimenting, leading to more elaborate designs like his Reebok Pump with the face of an attacking dog, the fins of a shark and the body of a high-top.

Hazzy’s success for creating fantastical sneaker transformations has led him to start his own graphic design operation. When he needs a bit of inspiration, Hazzy scrolls through all his favorite Instagram sneaker accounts and keeps an eye on the #sneakerart hashtag.
instagram:

The Sneaker Creatures of @hazzyboom

To see more of Hazzy Lin’s sneaker art creations, follow @hazzyboom on Instagram 

Graphic designer Hazzy Lin (@hazzyboom) is a self-described “sneaker head.”  Living in Taipei, Hazzy combines his love for street wear with his talent for illustration to create some of the most imaginative collections of sneaker art on Instagram.

His first sketch of a mutant shoe-creature was a monster inspired by a pair of Nike Air SB Jordans. The response from his followers encouraged him to continue experimenting, leading to more elaborate designs like his Reebok Pump with the face of an attacking dog, the fins of a shark and the body of a high-top.

Hazzy’s success for creating fantastical sneaker transformations has led him to start his own graphic design operation. When he needs a bit of inspiration, Hazzy scrolls through all his favorite Instagram sneaker accounts and keeps an eye on the #sneakerart hashtag.
instagram:

The Sneaker Creatures of @hazzyboom

To see more of Hazzy Lin’s sneaker art creations, follow @hazzyboom on Instagram 

Graphic designer Hazzy Lin (@hazzyboom) is a self-described “sneaker head.”  Living in Taipei, Hazzy combines his love for street wear with his talent for illustration to create some of the most imaginative collections of sneaker art on Instagram.

His first sketch of a mutant shoe-creature was a monster inspired by a pair of Nike Air SB Jordans. The response from his followers encouraged him to continue experimenting, leading to more elaborate designs like his Reebok Pump with the face of an attacking dog, the fins of a shark and the body of a high-top.

Hazzy’s success for creating fantastical sneaker transformations has led him to start his own graphic design operation. When he needs a bit of inspiration, Hazzy scrolls through all his favorite Instagram sneaker accounts and keeps an eye on the #sneakerart hashtag.
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instagram:

Tradition meets Technology at the 2014 Eco Edo Nihonbashi Art Aquarium

For more photos and videos from the exhibition, explore the COREDO室町 (Coredo Muromachi) and アートアクアリウム2014 (Art Aquarium 2014) location pages and browse the #アートアクアリウム (art aquarium) hashtag.

The Eco Edo Nihonbashi Art Aquarium 2014 opened last Friday at the Nihonbashi Mitsui Hall in Tokyo, Japan. This exhibition features 17 fish tank installations designed by “art aquarist” Hidetomo Kimura, whose work brings more than 5,000 goldfish on display in 70 aquariums.

These extraordinary aquatic installations are decked with LED lights, projection mapping, music and even scents. While the technology involved is quite advanced, the aquarium designs are inspired by Japan’s Edo Period (1603–1868) and incorporate traditional motifs such as classic glass fish bowls, folding screens and lanterns.

Hidetomo’s works will be on view at the Nihonbashi Mitsui Hall until September 23, 2014.
instagram:

Tradition meets Technology at the 2014 Eco Edo Nihonbashi Art Aquarium

For more photos and videos from the exhibition, explore the COREDO室町 (Coredo Muromachi) and アートアクアリウム2014 (Art Aquarium 2014) location pages and browse the #アートアクアリウム (art aquarium) hashtag.

The Eco Edo Nihonbashi Art Aquarium 2014 opened last Friday at the Nihonbashi Mitsui Hall in Tokyo, Japan. This exhibition features 17 fish tank installations designed by “art aquarist” Hidetomo Kimura, whose work brings more than 5,000 goldfish on display in 70 aquariums.

These extraordinary aquatic installations are decked with LED lights, projection mapping, music and even scents. While the technology involved is quite advanced, the aquarium designs are inspired by Japan’s Edo Period (1603–1868) and incorporate traditional motifs such as classic glass fish bowls, folding screens and lanterns.

Hidetomo’s works will be on view at the Nihonbashi Mitsui Hall until September 23, 2014.
instagram:

Tradition meets Technology at the 2014 Eco Edo Nihonbashi Art Aquarium

For more photos and videos from the exhibition, explore the COREDO室町 (Coredo Muromachi) and アートアクアリウム2014 (Art Aquarium 2014) location pages and browse the #アートアクアリウム (art aquarium) hashtag.

The Eco Edo Nihonbashi Art Aquarium 2014 opened last Friday at the Nihonbashi Mitsui Hall in Tokyo, Japan. This exhibition features 17 fish tank installations designed by “art aquarist” Hidetomo Kimura, whose work brings more than 5,000 goldfish on display in 70 aquariums.

These extraordinary aquatic installations are decked with LED lights, projection mapping, music and even scents. While the technology involved is quite advanced, the aquarium designs are inspired by Japan’s Edo Period (1603–1868) and incorporate traditional motifs such as classic glass fish bowls, folding screens and lanterns.

Hidetomo’s works will be on view at the Nihonbashi Mitsui Hall until September 23, 2014.
instagram:

Tradition meets Technology at the 2014 Eco Edo Nihonbashi Art Aquarium

For more photos and videos from the exhibition, explore the COREDO室町 (Coredo Muromachi) and アートアクアリウム2014 (Art Aquarium 2014) location pages and browse the #アートアクアリウム (art aquarium) hashtag.

The Eco Edo Nihonbashi Art Aquarium 2014 opened last Friday at the Nihonbashi Mitsui Hall in Tokyo, Japan. This exhibition features 17 fish tank installations designed by “art aquarist” Hidetomo Kimura, whose work brings more than 5,000 goldfish on display in 70 aquariums.

These extraordinary aquatic installations are decked with LED lights, projection mapping, music and even scents. While the technology involved is quite advanced, the aquarium designs are inspired by Japan’s Edo Period (1603–1868) and incorporate traditional motifs such as classic glass fish bowls, folding screens and lanterns.

Hidetomo’s works will be on view at the Nihonbashi Mitsui Hall until September 23, 2014.
instagram:

Tradition meets Technology at the 2014 Eco Edo Nihonbashi Art Aquarium

For more photos and videos from the exhibition, explore the COREDO室町 (Coredo Muromachi) and アートアクアリウム2014 (Art Aquarium 2014) location pages and browse the #アートアクアリウム (art aquarium) hashtag.

The Eco Edo Nihonbashi Art Aquarium 2014 opened last Friday at the Nihonbashi Mitsui Hall in Tokyo, Japan. This exhibition features 17 fish tank installations designed by “art aquarist” Hidetomo Kimura, whose work brings more than 5,000 goldfish on display in 70 aquariums.

These extraordinary aquatic installations are decked with LED lights, projection mapping, music and even scents. While the technology involved is quite advanced, the aquarium designs are inspired by Japan’s Edo Period (1603–1868) and incorporate traditional motifs such as classic glass fish bowls, folding screens and lanterns.

Hidetomo’s works will be on view at the Nihonbashi Mitsui Hall until September 23, 2014.
instagram:

Tradition meets Technology at the 2014 Eco Edo Nihonbashi Art Aquarium

For more photos and videos from the exhibition, explore the COREDO室町 (Coredo Muromachi) and アートアクアリウム2014 (Art Aquarium 2014) location pages and browse the #アートアクアリウム (art aquarium) hashtag.

The Eco Edo Nihonbashi Art Aquarium 2014 opened last Friday at the Nihonbashi Mitsui Hall in Tokyo, Japan. This exhibition features 17 fish tank installations designed by “art aquarist” Hidetomo Kimura, whose work brings more than 5,000 goldfish on display in 70 aquariums.

These extraordinary aquatic installations are decked with LED lights, projection mapping, music and even scents. While the technology involved is quite advanced, the aquarium designs are inspired by Japan’s Edo Period (1603–1868) and incorporate traditional motifs such as classic glass fish bowls, folding screens and lanterns.

Hidetomo’s works will be on view at the Nihonbashi Mitsui Hall until September 23, 2014.
instagram:

Tradition meets Technology at the 2014 Eco Edo Nihonbashi Art Aquarium

For more photos and videos from the exhibition, explore the COREDO室町 (Coredo Muromachi) and アートアクアリウム2014 (Art Aquarium 2014) location pages and browse the #アートアクアリウム (art aquarium) hashtag.

The Eco Edo Nihonbashi Art Aquarium 2014 opened last Friday at the Nihonbashi Mitsui Hall in Tokyo, Japan. This exhibition features 17 fish tank installations designed by “art aquarist” Hidetomo Kimura, whose work brings more than 5,000 goldfish on display in 70 aquariums.

These extraordinary aquatic installations are decked with LED lights, projection mapping, music and even scents. While the technology involved is quite advanced, the aquarium designs are inspired by Japan’s Edo Period (1603–1868) and incorporate traditional motifs such as classic glass fish bowls, folding screens and lanterns.

Hidetomo’s works will be on view at the Nihonbashi Mitsui Hall until September 23, 2014.
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fohk:

Charlatan Swanky
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sosuperawesome:

Mini paintings on cedar by Cathy McMurray on Etsy
sosuperawesome:

Mini paintings on cedar by Cathy McMurray on Etsy
sosuperawesome:

Mini paintings on cedar by Cathy McMurray on Etsy
sosuperawesome:

Mini paintings on cedar by Cathy McMurray on Etsy
sosuperawesome:

Mini paintings on cedar by Cathy McMurray on Etsy
sosuperawesome:

Mini paintings on cedar by Cathy McMurray on Etsy
sosuperawesome:

Mini paintings on cedar by Cathy McMurray on Etsy
sosuperawesome:

Mini paintings on cedar by Cathy McMurray on Etsy
sosuperawesome:

Mini paintings on cedar by Cathy McMurray on Etsy
+
instagram:

The Sneaker Creatures of @hazzyboom

To see more of Hazzy Lin’s sneaker art creations, follow @hazzyboom on Instagram 

Graphic designer Hazzy Lin (@hazzyboom) is a self-described “sneaker head.”  Living in Taipei, Hazzy combines his love for street wear with his talent for illustration to create some of the most imaginative collections of sneaker art on Instagram.

His first sketch of a mutant shoe-creature was a monster inspired by a pair of Nike Air SB Jordans. The response from his followers encouraged him to continue experimenting, leading to more elaborate designs like his Reebok Pump with the face of an attacking dog, the fins of a shark and the body of a high-top.

Hazzy’s success for creating fantastical sneaker transformations has led him to start his own graphic design operation. When he needs a bit of inspiration, Hazzy scrolls through all his favorite Instagram sneaker accounts and keeps an eye on the #sneakerart hashtag.
instagram:

The Sneaker Creatures of @hazzyboom

To see more of Hazzy Lin’s sneaker art creations, follow @hazzyboom on Instagram 

Graphic designer Hazzy Lin (@hazzyboom) is a self-described “sneaker head.”  Living in Taipei, Hazzy combines his love for street wear with his talent for illustration to create some of the most imaginative collections of sneaker art on Instagram.

His first sketch of a mutant shoe-creature was a monster inspired by a pair of Nike Air SB Jordans. The response from his followers encouraged him to continue experimenting, leading to more elaborate designs like his Reebok Pump with the face of an attacking dog, the fins of a shark and the body of a high-top.

Hazzy’s success for creating fantastical sneaker transformations has led him to start his own graphic design operation. When he needs a bit of inspiration, Hazzy scrolls through all his favorite Instagram sneaker accounts and keeps an eye on the #sneakerart hashtag.
instagram:

The Sneaker Creatures of @hazzyboom

To see more of Hazzy Lin’s sneaker art creations, follow @hazzyboom on Instagram 

Graphic designer Hazzy Lin (@hazzyboom) is a self-described “sneaker head.”  Living in Taipei, Hazzy combines his love for street wear with his talent for illustration to create some of the most imaginative collections of sneaker art on Instagram.

His first sketch of a mutant shoe-creature was a monster inspired by a pair of Nike Air SB Jordans. The response from his followers encouraged him to continue experimenting, leading to more elaborate designs like his Reebok Pump with the face of an attacking dog, the fins of a shark and the body of a high-top.

Hazzy’s success for creating fantastical sneaker transformations has led him to start his own graphic design operation. When he needs a bit of inspiration, Hazzy scrolls through all his favorite Instagram sneaker accounts and keeps an eye on the #sneakerart hashtag.
instagram:

The Sneaker Creatures of @hazzyboom

To see more of Hazzy Lin’s sneaker art creations, follow @hazzyboom on Instagram 

Graphic designer Hazzy Lin (@hazzyboom) is a self-described “sneaker head.”  Living in Taipei, Hazzy combines his love for street wear with his talent for illustration to create some of the most imaginative collections of sneaker art on Instagram.

His first sketch of a mutant shoe-creature was a monster inspired by a pair of Nike Air SB Jordans. The response from his followers encouraged him to continue experimenting, leading to more elaborate designs like his Reebok Pump with the face of an attacking dog, the fins of a shark and the body of a high-top.

Hazzy’s success for creating fantastical sneaker transformations has led him to start his own graphic design operation. When he needs a bit of inspiration, Hazzy scrolls through all his favorite Instagram sneaker accounts and keeps an eye on the #sneakerart hashtag.
+
bokunosonzai:

Inside the Explosion
Fireworks viewed through the use of a drone.
bokunosonzai:

Inside the Explosion
Fireworks viewed through the use of a drone.
bokunosonzai:

Inside the Explosion
Fireworks viewed through the use of a drone.
bokunosonzai:

Inside the Explosion
Fireworks viewed through the use of a drone.
bokunosonzai:

Inside the Explosion
Fireworks viewed through the use of a drone.
bokunosonzai:

Inside the Explosion
Fireworks viewed through the use of a drone.
bokunosonzai:

Inside the Explosion
Fireworks viewed through the use of a drone.
+
+
+
instagram:

Signposts of Culture on an Unconventional Road with @mattslaby

To see more from photojournalist Matt Slaby’s test kitchen of photographic experiments, follow @mattslaby on Instagram.

Matt Slaby (@mattslaby) is a 6-foot-7 colorblind photographer based in Denver who was once told by Salman Rushdie that he was “too tall.” His Instagram photos are populated by spacemen, abandoned nuclear missile silos and fictional stories written for found snapshots.

"The signposts of culture are really set by the outliers and the weirdos," Matt says. He describes Instagram as his "test kitchen" for experimenting, receiving feedback and understanding “how subjects view their own world and what items they are tuned into."

Perhaps unsurprisingly, Matt traveled an “unconventional road into the creative world,” working his way through university and law school as a wilderness firefighter and an metropolitan EMT before taking on photography full time—just a month after passing his law exams.

"I love how things take on apparent order when you view them from a macro or micro perspective," he says. "It’s the middle distance that’s confusing, chaotic and kinda absurd."
instagram:

Signposts of Culture on an Unconventional Road with @mattslaby

To see more from photojournalist Matt Slaby’s test kitchen of photographic experiments, follow @mattslaby on Instagram.

Matt Slaby (@mattslaby) is a 6-foot-7 colorblind photographer based in Denver who was once told by Salman Rushdie that he was “too tall.” His Instagram photos are populated by spacemen, abandoned nuclear missile silos and fictional stories written for found snapshots.

"The signposts of culture are really set by the outliers and the weirdos," Matt says. He describes Instagram as his "test kitchen" for experimenting, receiving feedback and understanding “how subjects view their own world and what items they are tuned into."

Perhaps unsurprisingly, Matt traveled an “unconventional road into the creative world,” working his way through university and law school as a wilderness firefighter and an metropolitan EMT before taking on photography full time—just a month after passing his law exams.

"I love how things take on apparent order when you view them from a macro or micro perspective," he says. "It’s the middle distance that’s confusing, chaotic and kinda absurd."
instagram:

Signposts of Culture on an Unconventional Road with @mattslaby

To see more from photojournalist Matt Slaby’s test kitchen of photographic experiments, follow @mattslaby on Instagram.

Matt Slaby (@mattslaby) is a 6-foot-7 colorblind photographer based in Denver who was once told by Salman Rushdie that he was “too tall.” His Instagram photos are populated by spacemen, abandoned nuclear missile silos and fictional stories written for found snapshots.

"The signposts of culture are really set by the outliers and the weirdos," Matt says. He describes Instagram as his "test kitchen" for experimenting, receiving feedback and understanding “how subjects view their own world and what items they are tuned into."

Perhaps unsurprisingly, Matt traveled an “unconventional road into the creative world,” working his way through university and law school as a wilderness firefighter and an metropolitan EMT before taking on photography full time—just a month after passing his law exams.

"I love how things take on apparent order when you view them from a macro or micro perspective," he says. "It’s the middle distance that’s confusing, chaotic and kinda absurd."
instagram:

Signposts of Culture on an Unconventional Road with @mattslaby

To see more from photojournalist Matt Slaby’s test kitchen of photographic experiments, follow @mattslaby on Instagram.

Matt Slaby (@mattslaby) is a 6-foot-7 colorblind photographer based in Denver who was once told by Salman Rushdie that he was “too tall.” His Instagram photos are populated by spacemen, abandoned nuclear missile silos and fictional stories written for found snapshots.

"The signposts of culture are really set by the outliers and the weirdos," Matt says. He describes Instagram as his "test kitchen" for experimenting, receiving feedback and understanding “how subjects view their own world and what items they are tuned into."

Perhaps unsurprisingly, Matt traveled an “unconventional road into the creative world,” working his way through university and law school as a wilderness firefighter and an metropolitan EMT before taking on photography full time—just a month after passing his law exams.

"I love how things take on apparent order when you view them from a macro or micro perspective," he says. "It’s the middle distance that’s confusing, chaotic and kinda absurd."
instagram:

Signposts of Culture on an Unconventional Road with @mattslaby

To see more from photojournalist Matt Slaby’s test kitchen of photographic experiments, follow @mattslaby on Instagram.

Matt Slaby (@mattslaby) is a 6-foot-7 colorblind photographer based in Denver who was once told by Salman Rushdie that he was “too tall.” His Instagram photos are populated by spacemen, abandoned nuclear missile silos and fictional stories written for found snapshots.

"The signposts of culture are really set by the outliers and the weirdos," Matt says. He describes Instagram as his "test kitchen" for experimenting, receiving feedback and understanding “how subjects view their own world and what items they are tuned into."

Perhaps unsurprisingly, Matt traveled an “unconventional road into the creative world,” working his way through university and law school as a wilderness firefighter and an metropolitan EMT before taking on photography full time—just a month after passing his law exams.

"I love how things take on apparent order when you view them from a macro or micro perspective," he says. "It’s the middle distance that’s confusing, chaotic and kinda absurd."
instagram:

Signposts of Culture on an Unconventional Road with @mattslaby

To see more from photojournalist Matt Slaby’s test kitchen of photographic experiments, follow @mattslaby on Instagram.

Matt Slaby (@mattslaby) is a 6-foot-7 colorblind photographer based in Denver who was once told by Salman Rushdie that he was “too tall.” His Instagram photos are populated by spacemen, abandoned nuclear missile silos and fictional stories written for found snapshots.

"The signposts of culture are really set by the outliers and the weirdos," Matt says. He describes Instagram as his "test kitchen" for experimenting, receiving feedback and understanding “how subjects view their own world and what items they are tuned into."

Perhaps unsurprisingly, Matt traveled an “unconventional road into the creative world,” working his way through university and law school as a wilderness firefighter and an metropolitan EMT before taking on photography full time—just a month after passing his law exams.

"I love how things take on apparent order when you view them from a macro or micro perspective," he says. "It’s the middle distance that’s confusing, chaotic and kinda absurd."
instagram:

Signposts of Culture on an Unconventional Road with @mattslaby

To see more from photojournalist Matt Slaby’s test kitchen of photographic experiments, follow @mattslaby on Instagram.

Matt Slaby (@mattslaby) is a 6-foot-7 colorblind photographer based in Denver who was once told by Salman Rushdie that he was “too tall.” His Instagram photos are populated by spacemen, abandoned nuclear missile silos and fictional stories written for found snapshots.

"The signposts of culture are really set by the outliers and the weirdos," Matt says. He describes Instagram as his "test kitchen" for experimenting, receiving feedback and understanding “how subjects view their own world and what items they are tuned into."

Perhaps unsurprisingly, Matt traveled an “unconventional road into the creative world,” working his way through university and law school as a wilderness firefighter and an metropolitan EMT before taking on photography full time—just a month after passing his law exams.

"I love how things take on apparent order when you view them from a macro or micro perspective," he says. "It’s the middle distance that’s confusing, chaotic and kinda absurd."
instagram:

Signposts of Culture on an Unconventional Road with @mattslaby

To see more from photojournalist Matt Slaby’s test kitchen of photographic experiments, follow @mattslaby on Instagram.

Matt Slaby (@mattslaby) is a 6-foot-7 colorblind photographer based in Denver who was once told by Salman Rushdie that he was “too tall.” His Instagram photos are populated by spacemen, abandoned nuclear missile silos and fictional stories written for found snapshots.

"The signposts of culture are really set by the outliers and the weirdos," Matt says. He describes Instagram as his "test kitchen" for experimenting, receiving feedback and understanding “how subjects view their own world and what items they are tuned into."

Perhaps unsurprisingly, Matt traveled an “unconventional road into the creative world,” working his way through university and law school as a wilderness firefighter and an metropolitan EMT before taking on photography full time—just a month after passing his law exams.

"I love how things take on apparent order when you view them from a macro or micro perspective," he says. "It’s the middle distance that’s confusing, chaotic and kinda absurd."
instagram:

Signposts of Culture on an Unconventional Road with @mattslaby

To see more from photojournalist Matt Slaby’s test kitchen of photographic experiments, follow @mattslaby on Instagram.

Matt Slaby (@mattslaby) is a 6-foot-7 colorblind photographer based in Denver who was once told by Salman Rushdie that he was “too tall.” His Instagram photos are populated by spacemen, abandoned nuclear missile silos and fictional stories written for found snapshots.

"The signposts of culture are really set by the outliers and the weirdos," Matt says. He describes Instagram as his "test kitchen" for experimenting, receiving feedback and understanding “how subjects view their own world and what items they are tuned into."

Perhaps unsurprisingly, Matt traveled an “unconventional road into the creative world,” working his way through university and law school as a wilderness firefighter and an metropolitan EMT before taking on photography full time—just a month after passing his law exams.

"I love how things take on apparent order when you view them from a macro or micro perspective," he says. "It’s the middle distance that’s confusing, chaotic and kinda absurd."
instagram:

Signposts of Culture on an Unconventional Road with @mattslaby

To see more from photojournalist Matt Slaby’s test kitchen of photographic experiments, follow @mattslaby on Instagram.

Matt Slaby (@mattslaby) is a 6-foot-7 colorblind photographer based in Denver who was once told by Salman Rushdie that he was “too tall.” His Instagram photos are populated by spacemen, abandoned nuclear missile silos and fictional stories written for found snapshots.

"The signposts of culture are really set by the outliers and the weirdos," Matt says. He describes Instagram as his "test kitchen" for experimenting, receiving feedback and understanding “how subjects view their own world and what items they are tuned into."

Perhaps unsurprisingly, Matt traveled an “unconventional road into the creative world,” working his way through university and law school as a wilderness firefighter and an metropolitan EMT before taking on photography full time—just a month after passing his law exams.

"I love how things take on apparent order when you view them from a macro or micro perspective," he says. "It’s the middle distance that’s confusing, chaotic and kinda absurd."